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Cover
Table of Contents
Editor's Notes
Donations
Submission Guidelines
Website

Stories & Essays
Copy Machine Repair Guy
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By D.E. Fredd
Corrupted Youth
_ By Kurt Kirchmeier
Dragon's Breath
_ By Lionel Cheng
Even the Damned Deserve to Love
_ By Anna Cortez
Gifts
_ By Jocelyn Johnson
House of Cards
_ By Steven J. Dines
In Doubt
_ By Stephanie Thoma
Lipstick
_ By Michelle Baron
Old Biddy
_ By Claire Nixon
Quinceañera
_ By Hester Young
The Fiddler and the Faerie
_ By Samantha Rae
When Barky Smiles
_ By S.E. Diamond

Poetry
2 A.M. Window Shopping
_ By Chris McGuffin
Alison
_ By Harriet O. Leach
Cloudy New Year's Morning
_ By Richard Fein
Not Easy
_ By Samantha Ogust
On Hearing Li-Young Lee Read His Poetry
_ By Foster Dickson
Prelude and Coda
_ By Richard Fein
Rainy Night Meditation
_ By Harriet O. Leach
Retreat
_ By Richard MacAleese
Silage Team--Machete Thirst
_ By Leland Jamieson
Starlight
_ By Richard MacAleese
Stolen Phone
_ By Jorge Jameson
The Abandoned Playground
_ By Richard MacAleese
Thought Provoking Baked Crescent
_ By Chris McGuffin

Art & Photography
Daniel Bravo
_ Paintings
Tove Hedengren
_ Photography
Peter Huettenrauch
_ Photography
E. Hunting
_ Drawings and Digital Art
Robin McQuay
_ Drawings
Iris Onica
_ Paintings
Pete Revonkorpi
_ Digital Art
Roy Wangsa
_ Photography

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Retreat
By Richard MacAleese


Nor ever known, the willow tree, as through the ages curs'd be,
Expressed its dying virtue in its endless, seeping tears.
And all the while vaguest fears unduly served the raven's years,
Who perched atop the willow's beard the curse at once set free.
The raven croaked its croak times three and flew at once into the sea
Above the willow's dying boughs, below the moonlight's glee.
If ever loved a beast death more, the moon till death would it abhor,
And so it gazed upon the willow's frothy, ancient hoar.
Into the west the bird digressed; its faint and lofty callings wept
Of friendships lost and burdens saved 'neath midnight's pressing lore.
It flew and flew in pained retreat, as if escape might yet it greet,
But never did the wicked woe of moonlight quit its feat.
When willow let its dying will beseech the earth its fate to still,
The moon in all its mighty skill could little to defend.
The morrow came to moonlight rend; to midnights elsewhere did it send,
And there it shone in majesty too mighty to ignore.
The raven in its frenzied flight took never notice of the light
And flew until the western shore of heaven came in sight.
Alas, alas, the raven fell from highest heaven to a hell
Where never even willow trees in all their patience could endure;
Where never dared the moon to gaze in all the might of all its days,
Although there lived a race of ways which brought more death than he.

The raven croaked its croak times three and lay there dying in a sea
Of living iron giants it had never hoped to see.

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RICHARD MACALEESE is a student of the Ohio State University. At an early age he acquired avid interests in religion, philosophy, mythology, legend, and writing, which together have produced a wide variety of abstract fictions. These interests have since produced over a hundred such writings--the fruits and foils of a compulsive habit.

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